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FAQ

What happens if a company issued 1099-MISC to its contractor but did not file a 1096 or submit the 1099-MISC copies to the IRS?
I like Lislue’s answer the best of the three so far. Once you file your taxes and include the 1099 income, the irs computers will go looking for a match (epecially if you use software and input the data from the 1099 into an equivalent 1099 form in the software. When the computers don’t find a match, then they go looking for the source documents, hence a letter/inquiry/audit gets started/sent out. Fines/penalties, etc get assessed.the source company msy self-trigger an audit when they deduct a high wages expense, but have not submitted any W-2 or 1099 forms. It might take a year, but the irs will catch up.
Are w-9/1099-misc forms automatically sent to the IRS by companies you worked for?
A W-9 is between you and the company — not the IRS.As for 1099’s, those are information returns that payers of various types of payments are required to file with the IRS. What you get is a copy of what the company files with the IRS. (Same thing with employees’ W-2’s, although those are filed with the Social Security Adminsitration — not the IRS.) I wouldn’t use the term “automatically”, but if the company doesn’t file with the IRS, then there’s nothing for it to send you a copy of.So, if you’ve gotten a form, that means that the original of that form has been (or will be) filed with the gov’t. (The deadlines are different, so you could get your copy before the government filing is actually done, but yours is still a copy of theirs.)Just one caveat : From your question, asking about W-9 and 1099-MISC, it sounds as if you are an independent contractor. If, however, you are a fictional “1099 employee” — or if you are in fact an employee who is simply misclassified as a contractor — then you may be getting a 1099-MISC with no form going to the IRS. Some employers who illegally pay employees as if they were not employees (no withholding, no FICA, etc.) decide to go “all the way”, and simply not report the pay to the IRS at all. In effect, they pay “off the books.” They still send you a 1099, because to not do so would cause you to question its absence. But the 1099 doesn’t get included with your tax return — only the income does — and including income that hasn’t been reported to the IRS is not that same problem as omitting income that has been reported to the IRS
Internal Revenue Service (IRS): How many W-2s were issued in 2012? How many Forms 1099-MISC?
I don't have an answer as I was also unable to find this statistic anywhere.  I can tell you that the Social Security Administration actually processes W2's and forwards the information to the IRS.  1099's however are processed by the IRS directly.The closest statistic I can find is that in 2010 there were 117,820,074 tax returns processed that showed salaries and wages (W2 income) on them.  That does not allow for returns where the taxpayers have multiple W2's nor does it allow for people who received a W2 and did not file a tax return, so all I can say is the number of W2's is something larger than 117M.
Are there any online templates for printing 2013 1099-MISC's from Excel or Word?
The link to the official forms are here: Page on irs.govIRS can also be contacted if forms need to be mailed to your office.
I sent a 1099-MISC of $13,000 to my business partner. Does the IRS deduct this from my taxes?
I am aware of times two people work together on a project but they are not really partners. For example, two lawyers who work a case together. In such cases, it sometimes happens that one person gets paid all the money and then splits it with the other person. In this case, the person who paid you may send you a 1099-Misc for the whole amount. Issuing a 1099-Misc to the other person in order to show you didn't make all that money yourself is common practice in such cases. How that works on your tax return (typically on a Schedule C unless you have an LLC or Corp) is that you report the full income. The IRS does check 1099's that show your name on them against the income you report, so you need to report it all. Then show your payment to the other guy as an expense. But the IRS won't adjust that for you. You have to show your expenses on the tax return when you file it.If you are truly partners in a business, you will need to file a business tax return and that return will show each of you how much gets reported on each of your tax returns (using form K-1). No 1099 would need to be issued to him/her in that case. If you have issued an incorrect 1099, you will need to send a corrected 1099 with zero on it.
How does the IRS know you made any income if a company you did work for does not file a 1099 –MISC?
In addition to the points that Garrick Saito makes, let me point out that if you do work for a business and that business should have filed a 1099-MISC return with respect to payments made to you, but did not, and that business gets examined by the IRS, the IRS will quite likely flag your return for an examination as well. What this means is that, two to five years later, the IRS will call you in and ask you to explain why this income, that they now know about because they found it on the examination of another taxpayer’s return, was not reported. And now you have a tax delinquency to pay for, over a return that was possibly as much as six years ago.If, however, your tax return reflects that income in an appropriate manner, you will just show the IRS your records and they will go “Ok then, thank you, have a nice day”. Or they will determine that you reported the income as required in the first place and not call you in for an examination at all.You are much better off reporting all of your taxable income whether or not you believe it has been reported to the IRS, and file a true and accurate return based on your records, not a false and deceptive return based on what you think you can get away with.
If I performed all work referenced on a 1099-MISC during 2011 but the check was issued to me and received in January 2013, can I still claim this income for 2012?
This is confusing.  You did work in tax year 2011.  You received a 1099-MISC at the end of that year showing the amount you were paid, but you were not paid then.  The company sent you Copy B of the 1099-MISC and sent Copy A to the IRS.  When you received that 1099-MISC in the mail, you should have contacted the company and told them you were never paid and that your not going to report this income on your 1040s because you never received it.  The company needs to efile a correction and they can still efile a correction even in 2014.If you were paid in January of 2013, then you report that income at the end of the 2013 tax year on your 1040s.  The company needs to issue a 1099 as well because the IRS double checks that what the payer paid is the same as what the recipient received in that tax year.  The IRS double checks the 1099-MISC values with the 1040s.  My best advice is dont hope that everything just works itself out and goes away with time.  The IRS chases discrepancies and will start issuing fines. Contact the company.  Ask them to efile a correction.  Get a new Copy B issued for TY2011 showing the amount paid was $0.  Get a Copy B for TY2013 showing the actual amount paid.  When you efile a 1099 with the IRS, the company will receive a receipt.  Get a copy of that receipt.  If you dont follow up, eventually all of this go to the Under/Over Reporting Department at the IRS and they will start issuing fines.
Internal Revenue Service (IRS): If I'm filing my tax returns, should I also mail all the 1099-INT and 1099-MISC forms that each organization is sending to me along with Form 1040?
The IRS does not want the forms from you. It gets the information directly from the payers. The reason you have to send the W-2 if you file a paper return is that W-2 forms go to the Social Security Administration, not the IRS. Later in the year, the IRS gets the information but not in time to compare against your tax return.Of course, you should keep a copy of all the forms for at least three years. Five is better just in case the IRS wants to claim your return is fraudulent. (I have all of my tax information for at least the past 15 years. Before that, it’s a little spotty but I have scanned copies of most documents going back to the mid-1990s.) These days most of the tax forms are available electronically or you can get a scanner to use a home. Just make certain you have timely backups of your computer in case it’s stolen or crashes.
How can I file a form 1099-misc and a 1099B together, if the 1099-misc is due by January 31st and 1099B won't arrive until February?
I’m guessing that you are the person who is receiving those forms. If that is the case, why are you concerned about filing them? The people (or companies) who made the payments to you are the ones who have to file them — what you get is a copy of what was filed by them. They are “information returns”, filed with the IRS and provided to you to furnish information.The only time you would have to file one of those is if there was tax withheld is a reported transaction, and you need to furnish the proof of withholding with your 1040. But that’s kind of unusual with those forms.Worst case, if you had withholding shown on both a 1099-MISC and a 1099-B, and you had to attach them both to your return, you would just have to wait to file your return. Not a problem unless you make it a problem.